FERGUSON, MO - AUGUST 17: Demonstrators raise their arms and chant, "Hands up, Don't Shoot", as police clear them from the street as they protest the shooting death of Michael Brown on August 17, 2014 in Ferguson, Missouri. Police sprayed pepper spray, shot smoke, gas and flash grenades as violent outbreaks have taken place in Ferguson since the shooting death of Michael Brown by a Ferguson police officer on August 9th. (Photo by Joe Raedle/Getty Images)

FERGUSON, MO – AUGUST 17: Demonstrators raise their arms and chant, “Hands up, Don’t Shoot”, as police clear them from the street as they protest the shooting death of Michael Brown on August 17, 2014 in Ferguson, Missouri. Police sprayed pepper spray, shot smoke, gas and flash grenades as violent outbreaks have taken place in Ferguson since the shooting death of Michael Brown by a Ferguson police officer on August 9th. (Photo by Joe Raedle/Getty Images)

Lazone Grays Jr. is the founder and President of IBSA Inc., and a contributing columnist to ContraCritic News.

Lazone Grays Jr. is the founder and President of IBSA Inc., and a contributing columnist to ContraCritic News.

The time has come in America where who we are and what we stand for is at one of its greatest test. Do we rise above chaos or must we finally be consumed by it?

Our history of internal strife, turmoil, and standoff is well documented as with the historical facts of how they were resolved. Sometimes peaceful and often bloody, we have always moved from each point to the other; with sacrifice being required on all sides. We sacrificed blood and position. Money and fame. But in the end what we eventually lose or gain becomes our footnote/end note in history; whether we like or accept the outcome or not.

It was bound to happen that the issue of race relations would become front and center as America struggled with the ancient old question of “what do you do with millions of descendants of the Trans-Atlantic slave trade?” Let’s face it, there was never any intention that slavery was to end in it’s beginning. At the time, it was thought that it would go on forever and that those of African descent would always be less-than the White populous in America. But as time goes on, the change of attitude, authority and the environments of a society would dictate change; whether for good, or bad.

So here we are at another crucial crossroad in time where history will be defined in our ability; or inability to move from one point of chaos to another one of peace. As Martin Luther King Jr. coined the title of his book “Community or Chaos: Where do we go from here?”, it begs the question of “does America have what it takes to rise above it’s own chaos in order to reach an even greater good?”

I ponder the ways of our country when it seems easier to ignore truth in order to forget it’s past, but we all know that it is the past that has always been the beacon to which a country; and it’s people must use to gauge the veracity of it’s future. With each passing day, Ferguson begins to look like Palestine, some Middle East or foreign hotbed of conflict, and now our system of power is flexed as a brute crushing and suppressing it’s own people. Even a child asked, “how did it come to this?”

That we have arrived to this moment of time is understandable; and probably expected, what no one seems to knows or understand is where do we, or will we, go from here?

This is a bit more complex than gambling on the horse deemed the long shot. There is more at stake than a crown, award, plaque or who gets to stand in the winners circle. I see no winners if what it leave is one side hurting and the other claiming victory because they shed the least blood. It does not matter which side is victorious because we all lose a part of us when no one wins.

Many secure in the comforts of their home can pretend that this is just about ‘them’, forgetting that it really is about US. The world isn’t looking at the rich or poor, Black or White, the silent or the outraged, what the world sees is an implosion that was bound to happier sooner or later.

Yes, while the eyes of the world is pinned to their TV screens, the radio and now Internet, in their own minds they must be wondering is this a moment that defines King’s question, and are no doubt waiting to exhale on what the final outcome will be?

I have strong inclination that a resolve will come about, even if it is not the one I would like to see. Knowing the history of my country, I am resigned to the fact that this too shall pass; but that does not abate my fears of what comes next? A resurgence of hate or an avalanche of peace? A rise in bloodshed or a decline in morality? A peak in hatred or a decline in loving our fellow man?

Only time will tell.

Shootout at the Chicago Corral | Daily Stormer

Shootout at the Chicago Corral | Daily Stormer

michael-dunn-16x9-w1600h1200

black kid with gun

choke

Timothy Dwight Smith is the Editor-and Chief at ContraCritic News, where he writes about culture, politics, and social issues.

Timothy Dwight Smith is the Editor-and Chief at ContraCritic News, where he writes about culture, politics, and social issues.

In the three days following Michael Brown’s killing by Ferguson, MO police, I’ve been covering the story extensively on contracritic.com, as well as engaging the community in discussions concerning the larger issues of race and racism as it relates to young black males in America.

I recently had one of these conversations with a black woman from Kansas named Aly Oh. Oh has a Masters degree in business and works for a non-profit organization in Topeka. Our chat wasn’t necessarily an interview, but she did present many relevant questions about the ongoing debate involving black-on-black crime (specifically black homicides) vs. white-on black killings, and the disparity in media coverage and uproar by the community following these types of incidents.

Our discussion began with Oh making the following statement about the imbalance of attention given to black victimization depending on who’s perpetrating the act:

“When someone from another race kills us (Black people), it makes National news and everyone is in an uproar. Yet when we kill ourselves, daily, people rarely bat an eye. If we are going to be mad, let’s be mad at all of the killings. It just needs to stop. Period.”

Me: The police swear an oath to protect and serve the community, when this oath is violated in such a heinous way, like cold-blooded murder, the violation is unique because trust has been broken between the institution supposedly in place to protect citizens and the citizens themselves.

Of course we understand all killing is wrong. But cops killing community members is a unique violation which deserves serious contemplation and community uproar.

Blacks who kill other blacks with guns usually do so to protect a drug economy which exist in America primarily because of racist institutions that have excluded the black underclass from accessing resources and opportunities necessary to succeed. This isn’t excuse making, it’s the truth. Both data and history tell us this.

To conflate these two realities, as if there’s no credible distinction, ignores black suffering, and even worse, buys into the myths white people have been telling blacks since the time of the Magna Carta: Black man [black woman] you are a nigger and an animal. All the wrong you do is done purely out of senselessness because you lack the ability to reason and function as a human being.

This is unreality and white supremacy rhetoric.

Blacks killing one another needs to stop, but there’s a reason why the drug economy exist in inner cities, namely, racist institutions.

When white police officers kill black men on the street because they’re black men, after swearing an oath to protect the Constitutional Rights of the community, this action represents the furtherance of more racism; the police then become not an arm of justice but a facilitator of white supremacy.

This is a distinction with a difference that black people, especially, need to understand clear. Otherwise you’ll find yourself repeating the lies of the oppressor.

Oh: I do understand the distinction and that there are underlying agendas at work. But what are we as black people doing to address that? We’ll march in a minute when we feel an affront, but are we as unified and vocal when it comes to saving ourselves and our youth? Let’s march for that and come together, not just when it’s someone else against us.

Me: A unique solution must be created to address whats happening in black ghettos, different problems require different solutions.

Marching and protests aren’t going to solve what’s happening in the ghettos. Only organizing around economics will.

If the ghetto is ever going to be transformed from “Murderville” to men mentoring men to become business minded, blacks have to discard the idea that we can have transformation through integration – a lie blacks have snuggled for far too long. Blacks are not going to partner their way out suffering if those partners are white, it just isn’t going to happen.

Blacks must create an economically sustainable community by partnering with other black people to provide services and necessities to their community. Exploit the power of the 60 billion dollar black consumer market to our own benefit by producing something of value other black people can spend their money on.

But this takes rebuilding a trust between black people that has been broken down by white supremacist brainwashing and Willie Lynch syndrome. This is what creates the suspicion among blacks about other black people. It’s not the actions of other blacks which has created the distrust in our community, it’s the nearly 400 years of brainwashing.

This is fixable. But it all starts with empowering blacks through education; an education which helps blacks rediscover who they are and then immediately pivoting to building black businesses which exclusively provide necessities and services to the black community. When we get this, there’ll be no more “Murderville.”

Oh: I agree with you on your points Timothy and in no way am I trying to minimize the violence against our ancestors. I simply feel that we as a people owe it to ourselves and our ancestors to stop killing ourselves and not just speak on violence when it comes from outside.

Me: We’ll never stop black people from killing one another, no more than whites will stop whites from killing each other, or Asians, or Latinos, etc., this is what human beings do, and most murders happen intraracially for every race, not just black people. A fact the media appears incapable of admitting.

But in typical fashion it is blacks that are perceived by society as being exceptional when it comes to murder. We aren’t exceptional, we’re human just like everyone else. At this very moment, white Israelis are bombing white Palestinians with the backing of a white American government. Is this not white-on-white crime on a scale that dwarfs all of what’s taking place among blacks in places like Chicago, Detroit, California, and Baltimore?! I’d say so, but it isn’t perceived that way is it? Of course not.

Like Malcom X stated, “Blacks are the only people in America that aren’t supposed to be violent.” Blacks get condemned for being violent even when violence is justified. Meanwhile whites engage in violence on scales unimaginable against other whites and people of color here in America and abroad without as much as a raised collective eye brow.

This is why, in my opinion, focusing attention on blacks killing blacks is counterproductive, at the least, and perpetuation of myth at the worst.

Oh: I understand your point, but taking into account Topeka KS and the murders that have taken place in not only 2014 but previous years, is it not disproportionate given our population percentage? Every race does have murderers, that is fact. But are we to excuse the fact that we kill ourselves just because other races do the same? Acknowledging black-on-black violence is not counterproductive, nor is it condoning violence against us by the police. It’s wrong on either side is my point. I don’t discount your opinion, but I won’t back down from mine either.

Me: I respect your opinion Aly. And black homicide in America is disproportionate by percentage to other races, but again the factors for why these numbers are disproportionate matters if we are to have an honest assessment of the issue and how we can take steps to change it.

The biggest factor for why black homicide rates are higher is do to those in the black community competing for space in a drug economy. A drug economy which primarily exist because blacks have been systematically excluded from the mainstream economy – due to racism. Add to this the government’s willingness to supply drugs to black distribution channels in the ghetto, while also providing guns to protect these channels.

The drug economy is the only economy the federal government has ever subsidized for black people. Think about that for a moment. They provide the product and the means to protect the product, at that point all that is needed is willing workers. Blacks have never been afraid of work. Is it no wonder poor communities opt into the drug trade? It’s damn near common sense for the poor. The only problem is even this system is set up for blacks to fail due to targeted policing and mass incarceration for not the murders to protect drug turf, but non-violent offenses. The possessing of the same drugs supplied to them by the government. It’s a classic bait-and-switch being done on the poor – who are overwhelmingly black and Latino- by the federal government; a government that willingly chooses to be racist toward non-white people.

These are the causes of black homicide. Viewed in this context, doesn’t it make black murder more explainable, even if one refuses to condone it?

Blacks occupy unique circumstances in America.

Oh: That is true. I agree wholeheartedly. The same system that provides the drugs is the one that makes you a slave and/or prisoner for selling them and fuels much of the black-on-black killing. Lack of education and job opportunities are also huge factors. So why aren’t our black leaders making these things a media issue? I have never seen these facts addressed during a news broadcast. When media wants ratings they talk about racially motivated killings all day long. I don’t see them discussing the root issues in our community. I don’t see them caring as much about the daily killings that happen. I don’t hear us talking about black-on-black killings as much, as if we have seemingly accepted them as a way of life.

Me: Because most of our black leaders benefit from the present set of arrangements. The so-called leaders in the black community primarily exist in our black churches and advocacy organizations, this has always been so since Emancipation. Some of these individuals have moved from street advocacy to political positions over time.

The drug economy, and all its death and destruction, is both a black preacher’s dream and a black advocate’s dream, if they’re corrupt and lack real concern for black people. The drug economy, and all its ills, keeps the exploitation wheel good and oiled to continue exploiting black people for profit. That’s the black-on-black crime that needs to be addressed. Not gangbangers protecting drug turf, but so-called gospel preachers and advocates bleeding the black poor dry of the little money they possess. The pen is truly mightier than the sword, these parasites prove it.

You can’t preach a prosperity gospel, which we must recognize is a gospel of exploitation, to black people who are already prosperous. Individuals who have created wealth by holding on to the resources they’ve earned through business, not by gambling and giving it away.

You can’t tell an economically self-sustaining community that their best protection against institutional racism is to march and protest – beg white people for accommodations in a system designed to benefit whites and whites alone, which is the present state of things. A self-sustained black community would recognize this as advocating surrender rather than success; submission rather than dictating one’s own destiny; and they’d recognize this kind of advocating is merely a vain attempt to hold blacks in their place, in a position beneath whites.

This is why today’s so-called black leaders aren’t speaking about what we’re discussing right now. You’re not going to see these rats discussing anything like this on the news, or in the paper. But if they really were who they said they were, and wanted what they claim they wanted – black prosperity and economic mobility, and attainment of political power – you would, but they don’t really want any of these things, they simply want to enrich themselves on black suffering. They benefit from white racism. They’re selling black people out in the name of god and integration.

Oh: I agree with you to some extent, but our people as a whole are not so ignorant. Some of us make a choice to do the things we do. We understand that problems exist but where is an honest voice to educate the people? There is historical white racism . . . but would you disagree that there is an even greater degree of self hate?

Me: Being ignorant doesn’t mean your choices don’t matter, or that you’ve been forced to make choices against your will, it just means you’re making decisions without useful insight to understand those decisions aren’t in your own best interest.

This is black people’s biggest problem. We can address symptoms all day long, but it’s time to diagnose the disease that is causing the symptoms. Black-on-black crime is not a disease, it’s a symptom of a disease. Blacks buying into prosperity gospels isn’t a disease, it’s a symptom of a disease. Blacks advocating more integration rather than advocating for economically sustainable black communities isn’t the disease, it’s a symptom.

The disease is institutional and internalized racism as well as white supremacist brainwashing. Blacks believe there is no other reality for them because racism has been so internalized. They don’t remember, or were never taught, who they were before they contracted this disease. And you’re right, it is self-hate. But it’s the brainwashing that causes blacks to hate themselves.

This is where our community finds itself at present. In denial and confused. And you know you’re confused when you really believe the cure to your disease is to be found in cooperating with the persons who transmitted the disease to you in the first place.

As far as locating honest voices to educate the people? I say that answer is to be found in you every time you look in the mirror Aly Oh.

Oh: In treating the disease we would be remiss to fight hate with hate. Every white person isn’t evil, just as every black person isn’t a threat. We can acknowledge the past without repeating it. The dialogue that we’re having today is powerful, but means nothing if there is no love and action behind our words. Cooperating with an oppressor is worthless . . . You have to decide to stop behaving like the oppressed. I do understand that the system is not designed in our favor, but conscious individuals have a choice to think and do beyond the confines and stereotypes…

I understand your passion and I thank you for thinking outside the normal parameters. We know we’ve got to do better as a people, myself included.

Me: Our choices are no better than our understanding of self. Educate black people as to who they are, and they’ll make better choices. Tell black people the truth and they’ll make better choices. But everyone cannot be saved.

Thank you for this talk.

Oh: Thank you. Maybe one day we can get some media coverage for this discussion.

Well Aly, you just did dear, you just did.

Ms. Aly Oh.

Ms. Aly Oh.

black-violence_thumb

michael-dunn-16x9-w1600h1200

black kid with gun

choke

Timothy Dwight Smith is the Editor-and Chief at ContraCritic News, where he writes about culture, politics, and social issues.

Timothy Dwight Smith is the Editor-and Chief at ContraCritic News, where he writes about culture, politics, and social issues.

In the three days following Michael Brown’s killing by Ferguson, MO police, I’ve been covering the story extensively on contracritic.com, as well as engaging the community in discussions concerning the larger issues of race and racism as it relates to young black males in America.

I recently had one of these conversations with a black woman from Kansas named Aly Oh. Oh has a Masters degree in business and works for a non-profit organization in Topeka. Our chat wasn’t necessarily an interview, but she did present many relevant questions about the ongoing debate involving black-on-black crime (specifically black homicides) vs. white-on black killings, and the disparity in media coverage and uproar by the community following these types of incidents.

Our discussion began with Oh making the following statement about the imbalance of attention given to black victimization depending on who’s perpetrating the act:

“When someone from another race kills us (Black people), it makes National news and everyone is in an uproar. Yet when we kill ourselves, daily, people rarely bat an eye. If we are going to be mad, let’s be mad at all of the killings. It just needs to stop. Period.”

Me: The police swear an oath to protect and serve the community, when this oath is violated in such a heinous way, like cold-blooded murder, the violation is unique because trust has been broken between the institution supposedly in place to protect citizens and the citizens themselves.

Of course we understand all killing is wrong. But cops killing community members is a unique violation which deserves serious contemplation and community uproar.

Blacks who kill other blacks with guns usually do so to protect a drug economy which exist in America primarily because of racist institutions that have excluded the black underclass from accessing resources and opportunities necessary to succeed. This isn’t excuse making, it’s the truth. Both data and history tell us this.

To conflate these two realities, as if there’s no credible distinction, ignores black suffering, and even worse, buys into the myths white people have been telling blacks since the time of the Magna Carta: Black man [black woman] you are a nigger and an animal. All the wrong you do is done purely out of senselessness because you lack the ability to reason and function as a human being.

This is unreality and white supremacy rhetoric.

Blacks killing one another needs to stop, but there’s a reason why the drug economy exist in inner cities, namely, racist institutions.

When white police officers kill black men on the street because they’re black men, after swearing an oath to protect the Constitutional Rights of the community, this action represents the furtherance of more racism; the police then become not an arm of justice but a facilitator of white supremacy.

This is a distinction with a difference that black people, especially, need to understand clear. Otherwise you’ll find yourself repeating the lies of the oppressor.

Oh: I do understand the distinction and that there are underlying agendas at work. But what are we as black people doing to address that? We’ll march in a minute when we feel an affront, but are we as unified and vocal when it comes to saving ourselves and our youth? Let’s march for that and come together, not just when it’s someone else against us.

Me: A unique solution must be created to address whats happening in black ghettos, different problems require different solutions.

Marching and protests aren’t going to solve what’s happening in the ghettos. Only organizing around economics will.

If the ghetto is ever going to be transformed from “Murderville” to men mentoring men to become business minded, blacks have to discard the idea that we can have transformation through integration – a lie blacks have snuggled for far too long. Blacks are not going to partner their way out suffering if those partners are white, it just isn’t going to happen.

Blacks must create an economically sustainable community by partnering with other black people to provide services and necessities to their community. Exploit the power of the 60 billion dollar black consumer market to our own benefit by producing something of value other black people can spend their money on.

But this takes rebuilding a trust between black people that has been broken down by white supremacist brainwashing and Willie Lynch syndrome. This is what creates the suspicion among blacks about other black people. It’s not the actions of other blacks which has created the distrust in our community, it’s the nearly 400 years of brainwashing.

This is fixable. But it all starts with empowering blacks through education; an education which helps blacks rediscover who they are and then immediately pivoting to building black businesses which exclusively provide necessities and services to the black community. When we get this, there’ll be no more “Murderville.”

Oh: I agree with you on your points Timothy and in no way am I trying to minimize the violence against our ancestors. I simply feel that we as a people owe it to ourselves and our ancestors to stop killing ourselves and not just speak on violence when it comes from outside.

Me: We’ll never stop black people from killing one another, no more than whites will stop whites from killing each other, or Asians, or Latinos, etc., this is what human beings do, and most murders happen intraracially for every race, not just black people. A fact the media appears incapable of admitting.

But in typical fashion it is blacks that are perceived by society as being exceptional when it comes to murder. We aren’t exceptional, we’re human just like everyone else. At this very moment, white Israelis are bombing white Palestinians with the backing of a white American government. Is this not white-on-white crime on a scale that dwarfs all of what’s taking place among blacks in places like Chicago, Detroit, California, and Baltimore?! I’d say so, but it isn’t perceived that way is it? Of course not.

Like Malcom X stated, “Blacks are the only people in America that aren’t supposed to be violent.” Blacks get condemned for being violent even when violence is justified. Meanwhile whites engage in violence on scales unimaginable against other whites and people of color here in America and abroad without as much as a raised collective eye brow.

This is why, in my opinion, focusing attention on blacks killing blacks is counterproductive, at the least, and perpetuation of myth at the worst.

Oh: I understand your point, but taking into account Topeka KS and the murders that have taken place in not only 2014 but previous years, is it not disproportionate given our population percentage? Every race does have murderers, that is fact. But are we to excuse the fact that we kill ourselves just because other races do the same? Acknowledging black-on-black violence is not counterproductive, nor is it condoning violence against us by the police. It’s wrong on either side is my point. I don’t discount your opinion, but I won’t back down from mine either.

Me: I respect your opinion Aly. And black homicide in America is disproportionate by percentage to other races, but again the factors for why these numbers are disproportionate matters if we are to have an honest assessment of the issue and how we can take steps to change it.

The biggest factor for why black homicide rates are higher is do to those in the black community competing for space in a drug economy. A drug economy which primarily exist because blacks have been systematically excluded from the mainstream economy – due to racism. Add to this the government’s willingness to supply drugs to black distribution channels in the ghetto, while also providing guns to protect these channels.

The drug economy is the only economy the federal government has ever subsidized for black people. Think about that for a moment. They provide the product and the means to protect the product, at that point all that is needed is willing workers. Blacks have never been afraid of work. Is it no wonder poor communities opt into the drug trade? It’s damn near common sense for the poor. The only problem is even this system is set up for blacks to fail due to targeted policing and mass incarceration for not the murders to protect drug turf, but non-violent offenses. The possessing of the same drugs supplied to them by the government. It’s a classic bait-and-switch being done on the poor – who are overwhelmingly black and Latino- by the federal government; a government that willingly chooses to be racist toward non-white people.

These are the causes of black homicide. Viewed in this context, doesn’t it make black murder more explainable, even if one refuses to condone it?

Blacks occupy unique circumstances in America.

Oh: That is true. I agree wholeheartedly. The same system that provides the drugs is the one that makes you a slave and/or prisoner for selling them and fuels much of the black-on-black killing. Lack of education and job opportunities are also huge factors. So why aren’t our black leaders making these things a media issue? I have never seen these facts addressed during a news broadcast. When media wants ratings they talk about racially motivated killings all day long. I don’t see them discussing the root issues in our community. I don’t see them caring as much about the daily killings that happen. I don’t hear us talking about black-on-black killings as much, as if we have seemingly accepted them as a way of life.

Me: Because most of our black leaders benefit from the present set of arrangements. The so-called leaders in the black community primarily exist in our black churches and advocacy organizations, this has always been so since Emancipation. Some of these individuals have moved from street advocacy to political positions over time.

The drug economy, and all its death and destruction, is both a black preacher’s dream and a black advocate’s dream, if they’re corrupt and lack real concern for black people. The drug economy, and all its ills, keeps the exploitation wheel good and oiled to continue exploiting black people for profit. That’s the black-on-black crime that needs to be addressed. Not gangbangers protecting drug turf, but so-called gospel preachers and advocates bleeding the black poor dry of the little money they possess. The pen is truly mightier than the sword, these parasites prove it.

You can’t preach a prosperity gospel, which we must recognize is a gospel of exploitation, to black people who are already prosperous. Individuals who have created wealth by holding on to the resources they’ve earned through business, not by gambling and giving it away.

You can’t tell an economically self-sustaining community that their best protection against institutional racism is to march and protest – beg white people for accommodations in a system designed to benefit whites and whites alone, which is the present state of things. A self-sustained black community would recognize this as advocating surrender rather than success; submission rather than dictating one’s own destiny; and they’d recognize this kind of advocating is merely a vain attempt to hold blacks in their place, in a position beneath whites.

This is why today’s so-called black leaders aren’t speaking about what we’re discussing right now. You’re not going to see these rats discussing anything like this on the news, or in the paper. But if they really were who they said they were, and wanted what they claim they wanted – black prosperity and economic mobility, and attainment of political power – you would, but they don’t really want any of these things, they simply want to enrich themselves on black suffering. They benefit from white racism. They’re selling black people out in the name of god and integration.

Oh: I agree with you to some extent, but our people as a whole are not so ignorant. Some of us make a choice to do the things we do. We understand that problems exist but where is an honest voice to educate the people? There is historical white racism . . . but would you disagree that there is an even greater degree of self hate?

Me: Being ignorant doesn’t mean your choices don’t matter, or that you’ve been forced to make choices against your will, it just means you’re making decisions without useful insight to understand those decisions aren’t in your own best interest.

This is black people’s biggest problem. We can address symptoms all day long, but it’s time to diagnose the disease that is causing the symptoms. Black-on-black crime is not a disease, it’s a symptom of a disease. Blacks buying into prosperity gospels isn’t a disease, it’s a symptom of a disease. Blacks advocating more integration rather than advocating for economically sustainable black communities isn’t the disease, it’s a symptom.

The disease is institutional and internalized racism as well as white supremacist brainwashing. Blacks believe there is no other reality for them because racism has been so internalized. They don’t remember, or were never taught, who they were before they contracted this disease. And you’re right, it is self-hate. But it’s the brainwashing that causes blacks to hate themselves.

This is where our community finds itself at present. In denial and confused. And you know you’re confused when you really believe the cure to your disease is to be found in cooperating with the persons who transmitted the disease to you in the first place.

As far as locating honest voices to educate the people? I say that answer is to be found in you every time you look in the mirror Aly Oh.

Oh: In treating the disease we would be remiss to fight hate with hate. Every white person isn’t evil, just as every black person isn’t a threat. We can acknowledge the past without repeating it. The dialogue that we’re having today is powerful, but means nothing if there is no love and action behind our words. Cooperating with an oppressor is worthless . . . You have to decide to stop behaving like the oppressed. I do understand that the system is not designed in our favor, but conscious individuals have a choice to think and do beyond the confines and stereotypes…

I understand your passion and I thank you for thinking outside the normal parameters. We know we’ve got to do better as a people, myself included.

Me: Our choices are no better than our understanding of self. Educate black people as to who they are, and they’ll make better choices. Tell black people the truth and they’ll make better choices. But everyone cannot be saved.

Thank you for this talk.

Oh: Thank you. Maybe one day we can get some media coverage for this discussion.

Well Aly, you just did dear, you just did.

Ms. Aly Oh.

Ms. Aly Oh.

bla

hera

Timothy Dwight Smith is the Editor-and Chief at ContraCritic News, where he writes about culture, politics, and social issues.

Timothy Dwight Smith is the Editor-and Chief at ContraCritic News, where he writes about culture, politics, and social issues.

So much for keeping promises…

Earlier this afternoon, Ferguson police chief Thomas Jackson informed the press his office would not be releasing the name of the officer who killed Michael Brown, citing death threats against the officer as the primary reason for nondisclosure. Brown’s killer is being protected by his brothers in blue. And it is this lack of transparency by Ferguson and St. Louis County police which feeds community suspicion that a thorough investigation will never take place.

Ferguson Police Department’s utter hypocrisy is unbelievable when we consider the lengths they’re willing to go to shield a killer from public scrutiny, only because the killer is a fellow officer, an officer who executed – in broad daylight – a member of the community he swore an oath to serve. Meanwhile their long history of racial profiling blacks for arrest has resulted in a steady stream of black faces on the local news. This disproportionate treatment underscores the level of indifference a nearly all-white police force possesses toward a mostly black community.

In the 24 hours following Brown’s slaying, before the streets of Ferguson began to burn, police had an opportunity to ease community tension by conducting a serious investigation from the outset, they chose not to. Instead police decided obfuscation, inaction and negligence was the proper response, as they often do in crimes involving black victims and white suspects. Let me count some of the ways which point to this being true:

1. Ferguson and St. Louis County police investigators left Michael Brown’s body to bake in the sweltering sun for over four hours after he was shot to death, destroying useful forensic evidence which could’ve been used to prove or disprove the opposing accounts of what transpired between Brown and the police officer. This evidence has now been lost forever.

2. Cell phones of eye-witnesses were confiscated by Ferguson and St. Louis County police investigators without a police warrant. There’s a very good chance someone captured the altercation between Brown and the police officer on their cell phone camera. Are we to believe police informed the property owners they did not have to comply and hand over their personal property or is it more likely police bullied these witnesses and made them believe compliance was mandatory to avoid being arrested?

3. Rather than immediately turning the investigation over to federal investigators, upon talking to witnesses on the scene, who all corroborated one another that the shooting was execution style, Ferguson police chose to hand over the case to St. Louis County police department. A police department with a long history of racism, prejudice and discrimination against blacks, and an ongoing operation of racial profiling and targeting blacks for arrest. This decision demonstrates transparency is something investigators in this case have little interest in.

4. Ferguson police patrol cars do not have dashboard cameras installed. As a result, the initial contact between Ferguson police and Brown is lost. Very convenient for the police officer who ultimately killed Brown. When questioned by the press about why dash cams were not installed on patrol cars, Ferguson police chief Thomas Jackson claims the cameras are sitting in boxes at the station. This bespeaks a culture of concealment and corruption. Why would Ferguson Police Department opt out of one of the primary measures to ensure police officers conduct themselves in a manner befitting their sworn oath to protect and serve the community?

5. Why was this officer scurried from the crime scene before news media arrived? Why has he still not been identified when even suspects in some of the most heinous crimes against children are identified immediately, despite death threats against them and their respective families? Police investigators are choosing to protect Brown’s killer in a fashion not afforded those who commit similar offenses. He’s being protected because he’s a police officer. We can be sure he isn’t being treated as a suspect. No interrogation, no isolation, no monitoring.

6. Why in the three days following this incident hasn’t the officer made a statement? Written or oral? If he was simply doing his job and has nothing to hide, why hasn’t he spoken to the public or offered condolences to the families affected by this tragedy? Is he lawyering up? If so, why does a law-abiding cop need representation? Is he manufacturing a story with the assistance of the investigating officers? It’s certainly a possibility. Will his statements, whenever they do come, be thorough or brief, off-the-cuff or from a lawyer? I think we know the answers to these questions already.

The investigators in this case have chosen to leave these questions unanswered. This level of incompetence and inaction doesn’t calm the fears of those in the black community who have witnessed time and again justice botched by police cover-ups and failures to conduct complete investigations.

This is why the city burns.

In my recent essay, “Home Is Where the Hatred Is,” I discuss those who advocate a black respectability politic which says, among other things, denounce any blacks who choose to riot rather than attend prayer vigils. But when young black males experience police brutality at astronomical levels, and witness what appears to be an endless stream of vigilantes and white police officers murdering those who share similar skin complexion as they do, a breaking point eventually arrives, and dignity dictates a destructive statement must be made, while the entire world is watching, to demonstrate just how viciously blacks despise a racist white power structure which discards their humanity like a filthy rag.

While I do feel some level of sympathy for business owners affected by the chaos, I don’t believe this should be the focus of discussion, instead, an earnest and thorough investigation should be commenced to unearth what is transpiring between North County police and a mostly black population which causes such levels of discontent to boil over into riots and looting. Pretending that every person who participated in Sunday’s riots did so out of mere opportunism is naive, and such ignorance dismisses the very real and extensive history of racial intolerance by white police officers against black citizens in North County.

The federal government and numerous research institutions have provided data which shows the racially disparate treatment afforded white and black citizens by St. Louis County police officers. Blacks are stopped by police at higher rates, ticketed at higher rates, detained at higher rates, arrested at higher rates, and report issues of police brutality at higher rates than whites, despite the data indicating whites are more likely to possess illegal weapons and drugs when searched by police.

Blacks, young and old, are tired of being harassed, profiled, discriminated against, and targeted for arrest by white law enforcement because of their skin color. It is this angst which drove some to torch businesses and bear arms against Ferguson and North County police Sunday night. You can call it misplaced rage, ignorance, misguided and unacceptable, or all the above, but with the whole world watching, blacks in Ferguson made a statement that something is wrong in their community, and it begins and ends with the present set of arrangements between black citizens and the white power structure in St. Louis.

Until we address these underlining issues of race, there’ll be more police misconduct, murders, and mayhem. In a recent Miami Herald article, Leonard Pitts writes, “Silence imposed on pain cannot indefinitely endure. People who are hurting will always, eventually, make themselves heard. Even if they must scream to do so.”

The black community in Ferguson, MO continues to scream tonight, but the question persist: Are the people with the power to change what these folks are screaming about even listening?

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Timothy Dwight Smith is the Editor-and Chief at ContraCritic News, where he writes about culture, politics, and social issues.

Timothy Dwight Smith is the Editor-and Chief at ContraCritic News, where he writes about culture, politics, and social issues.

In the aftermath of Michael Brown’s public execution by Ferguson, Missouri police, I hear the familiar calls by well-meaning but fearful blacks advising their community to remain calm and swallow their rage against institutional racism.

A prayer vigil was organized Sunday afternoon outside the Ferguson police department where Protestant ministers and members of the Nation of Islam repeated similar refrains to an angry crowd: “Stay respectful, don’t antagonize police, this is the only way the Brown family will have a shot at justice.”

The philosophy of black respectability has been preached by the cowardly and frightened for too long. From President Obama’s calls for blacks to demonstrate restraint and calm in the wake of Trayvon Martin’s murder to CNN news anchor Don Lemon instructing black teenagers to stop littering in Harlem if they wanted to avoid being harassed and beaten by NYPD, this passive, self-serving message, delivered by those who pretend to love black people, is harmful because it distracts attention away from the systems most responsible for black vulnerability.

Telling an outraged black community, who’s just witnessed another innocent teenager murdered by police, not to loot white businesses in their neighborhoods, when these parasitic businesses represent the white power structure that excludes blacks (white business owners who refuse to employ, live, work, worship and partner with black entrepreneurs to improve the conditions of the neighborhood) while simultaneously exploiting them for economic enrichment, doesn’t pass the sniff test. Destroying a system of exploitation can only be viewed as positive unless you’ve been thoroughly convinced being a slave has personal benefit.

Instructing the black community to treat a racist police system with utmost respect, at all times, in order to stay alive, and/or be treated as a citizen, when we’ve witnessed seemingly never-ending incidents like Trayvon Martin, like Jordan Davis, like Renisha McBride, like Eric Garner, like Michael Brown (as if blacks are incapable of understanding that respecting police doesn’t guarantee their children’s survival) is both bad advice and a strategy for continued victimization.

It’s a foolish game of blaming the victim rather than the victimizer. It’s rebuking the raped for wearing a short skirt rather than jailing the raper for sexual assault.

On the other hand, sound instruction worthy of the black community’s justified outrage must be a message which organizes blacks around, while educating blacks to, the reality that the only way racist institutions, like law enforcement in America, is going to stop murdering black men in the street for selling loose cigarettes; the only solution to solve the epidemic of racist white men murdering black teenage boys for loud music, or for carrying water guns, or for choosing to wear hoodies in the rain; the only measure which can be taken to ensure black women who knock on doors at night, in white neighborhoods, don’t get shotguns shoved in their faces, and heads blown off, is to make crystal clear to racist white institutions and racist white people that black citizens will use deadly force against ANYONE, including the police, who infringe upon their rights to life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness.

All other talk begins and ends right there.

Any other advice is supplemental to this.

We, the black community, can no longer live in fear of white oppression and white disapproval, believing that if we just “act right” we’ll survive in America.

This has proven far too often not to be the case.

Continuing to instruct blacks to behave in a manner that doesn’t work to solve any of our problems is a waste of time, and strengthens and sustains white supremacy.

If black life in America is to be valued the same as white life, than it must be defended in a similar fashion, by any means necessary.

If indeed Michael Brown did not commit any crime, and was still harassed and provoked into a physical altercation by Ferguson police, which resulted in the police officer brandishing his gun and shooting at Michael Brown, I assert to anyone who claims to love freedom and justice for all, that Justice says if Michael Brown did have a gun during such an incident he would’ve been within his moral rights to shoot that racist Ferguson cop dead right there on the spot. Leaving the officer bleeding in the street for all to see, just as Brown was left dead and alone Saturday afternoon.

If Michael Brown’s moral right to live free from oppression conflicts with man-made laws, those laws are unjust. Blacks must choose virtue over injustice.

Some will say such words incite violence against law enforcement, I disagree. Such a message empowers black people to love themselves enough not to allow individuals filled with hatred to make mourners of those who love them.

The notion that blacks should bear arms against racist police in order to protect themselves from unjustified police power is not a radical stance, it’s a common sense survival strategy. It’s an American ideal.

Those who would say this is radical, I say Patrick Henry was radical, Thomas Paine was radical, the Founding Fathers were radical, and any other white person who refused to be annihilated willingly by forces whom opposed their right to live free were radical.

Why then can’t black citizens be radical in defending their civil rights and when exercising equal protections under the law? This is only right. This is justice.

Furthermore, this is the only way the black community is ever going to place a check on the out-of-control use of deadly force being instituted against them daily by racist white citizens and police.

There must be a legitimate concern of righteous retribution for anyone who dares to threaten the life of an innocent black citizen in this country. Otherwise these racially-motivated killings will continue unabated.

These principles of righteous retribution, these checks on law enforcement are already operating now, but not for blacks, for whites. These checks ensure we don’t view on the evening news white teenage boys being gunned down by police officers. It’s this threat of righteous and violent retribution by the white community which protects their children from vigilantes and corrupt cops. The courts have recognized this agreement and stand ready to prosecute anyone who violates it, officer or citizen alike.

These same cops know they’d have to answer for their misdeeds if they choked a white woman to death on a sidewalk like they did Eric Gardner.

Black citizens occupy a completely different world altogether. Black life is cheap in America, it can be snuffed out on most days without as much as a mention in the newspaper or on television. Our lives are so devalued and disrespected even so-called black leaders routinely declare, in the aftermath of racially-motivated killings of loved ones, to remain calm and swallow anger; to let the police do their jobs – the same police who killed our children.

This nonsensical rhetoric passes for leadership in the black community today. Al Sharpton and Jesse Jackson, and those of their ilk, convince blacks that lying down to their oppressor; their killer; their exploiter, signifies respect for self, and the family of the victimized. All while racist whites plot their next public lynching of another black mother, father, son, daughter or friend.

Surrendering oneself to one’s oppressor isn’t respecting oneself, it’s the worse form of self-disrespect one can do.

Respect for self and love for community says, “If I’ve done nothing wrong, and someone tries to take my life or the life of anyone I love, that person has to die. No matter who they are; police officer, teacher, politician, priest, preacher, or peasant it doesn’t matter! I will defend myself and the lives of those I love no matter what comes after.”

This is what respect looks like.

This is how love of self and community operates to defend both from an oppressive system of violence and exploitation.

But most blacks are scared of whites. They fear whites more than they love themselves. Too many black people still want whites to accept them. They yet yearn for white approval and recognition. Sambo niggas, still operating under meritorious manumission, like a damn slave.

Black man, black woman, whites will never accept, recognize nor respect you until you demonstrate just how much love you have for yourself by standing up and refusing to accept being exploited and systematically murdered and destroyed by their racist institutions.

Power only recognizes power.

This is what love looks like in practice.

This is justice and fairness.

This is what it looks like to be free.

Will we do it?

Or will we wait wondering whether the next Michael Brown is us?

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Long day.

I spent most of today alone.

It’s been quite a few years since I spent a birthday this way. It was truly relaxing.

I took few calls, responded to a few text messages and didn’t open not one email.

But I thought a lot.

I thought a whole lot.

It’s amazing what can be appreciated when you take your foot off the accelerator and just cruise for awhile.

That’s what I did today. I cruised. Cruised and thought about what I want and plan to make happen in the next year.

I’ve realized, finally, that I must let go of the past if I’m going to survive and arrive at my destination.

So much of who I am, my very identity, is wrapped up in my past, but this must change.

The almost 10 years I’ve lived away from family and friends, familiar faces and familiar places has steeled me with an unshakeable resolve to continue climbing until I reach my fullest potential.

I’m not ashamed to say my potential is limitless IF I can allow myself to grow into the man I never imagined life would allow me to be.

I want that.

Not just for myself, but for all those others who need me; those people who at this moment may not even know my name, but they need what I have inside me to give. I must get from here to there to give it to them.

As I look around my old neighborhoods on visits, and my present environment; when I survey the landscape of America, politically, economically, spiritually, and communally, for my people, black people, I recognize unless something drastic and transformative takes place, we aren’t going to survive.

We will cease to exist completely.

This hurts my heart to say. It pains me to realize it’s more than words, it’s inevitable.

But then there’s hope too.

In a day and age when faith seems almost a curse word, my faith is still tied up in seeing my people reach a level of respect, dignity, and recognition that has to this point been unrealized.

With God anything is possible.

There’s been many dark days for me when I denied and tried my best to discredit and disbelieve that this was true. I was wrong.

With God anything is possible.

We must all discover something larger than ourselves if we are to ever see real change happen. To work and sweat and bleed only for self destroys and demoralizes the human spirit.

But when all that work, sweat, and blood is viewed in a larger context that encompasses something far greater than personal accomplishments, worldly accolades and recognition, there’s a chance lasting change can be realized.

I’m not the only one who feels this way.

You’re not either.

Despite how it seems some days, there are others who feel as you do and want what you want, just as much.

These individuals who possess an unmovable desire to leave the world better than they found it suffer hardships the average person couldn’t imagine.

To those people I say stay in the fight. Don’t allow pessimism disguised as realism to destroy your motivation and extinguish your drive.

Keep pushing. Plan and execute your dreams.

Shine.

Thank you to every single person who wished me a happy birthday I feel the love. I appreciate you more than words can express.

One love.

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Theodore Wafer tells the police investigator on the night he killed Renisha McBride, that he opens his door and McBride was standing right there. His gun discharges unbeknownst to him why.

“I open the security door….the person was standing right there,” Wafer said.

The person was STANDING RIGHT THERE (on the porch).

Yesterday on the witness stand Wafer testifies to hearing banging on the front door, and side door, and as he opens his front door, a shadowy figure rushes toward his porch and he fires his weapon out of fear for his life.

Mr. Wafer this is what we like to call an inconsistency.

A convenient inconsistency conjured up by you and your defense team over the last 9 months to try to create the “fear” which is required for you to be acquitted of murder.

Because Mr. Wafer any reasonable person knows if Ms. McBride was standing on your porch when you opened your door, there’s no way you were in fear for your life.

If McBride was standing there on your porch like you told the police the night you killed her, there’s little doubt you didn’t look out the peep hole and see her before opening the security door; there’s little doubt you didn’t see her damn near face-to-face once that door was opened; which gives you absolutely no justifiable reason to fire on her through the screen.

Mr. Wafer your life was not in danger, your ego was, your pride was, not your life.

Mr. Wafer you were upset and angry that you were awakened by loud banging, and when you saw a black girl in a hoodie on your porch, you retrieved your weapon, opened your front door, pointed your firearm in McBride’s face, and blew her head off.

You were angry about the beer bottles and syringes that had been left on your property in the past.

You were angry because in your mind you assigned responsibility for those bottles and syringes to people who looked like McBride.

And now this drunk and disoriented black woman has the audacity to show up on your porch at 4:30 am, and your just supposed to take it lying down and call the police?

Hell no.

Not you Mr. Wafer.

As you said on the stand, you refused to cower in your home. You refused to be a victim.

That’s why you killed Renisha McBride, she made you feel victimized. Her presence on your property, that early in the morning, under those circumstances represented an affront to your own personal ideas of law and order, and you decided to take it upon yourself to do something about it.

You murdered Ms. McBride in cold blood, then told the police it was an accident.

Then during police interrogation referenced the woman you murdered, again and again, as “it.”

Ms. McBride was not even a human being to you.

In your mind Mr. Wafer you killed something not someone.

Now you come in the courtroom 9 months later and give the world phony tears and feigned regret.

Where were your tears the night you murdered this young woman?

Where was your regret when you casually spoke to police investigators after shooting a woman in the face with a shotgun?

The only accident that was committed in this case was when a young black woman knocked on the wrong door, at the wrong time.

But it was you Mr. Wafer who possessed the wrong intentions when opening that door, that’s why you took her life.

You deserve prison for your wrongdoing, and hopefully that’s what you receive. — via ContraCritic News

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Dear CCN readers,

Earlier this afternoon in Los Angeles a judge ruled against Donald Sterling in his lawsuit to retain ownership of the L.A. Clippers. As a result of the court ruling, the team may now be officially sold.

Thank you to all those who signed the Change.org petition, organized by ContraCritic News, to remove Donald Sterling as Clippers’ owner.

Sterling’s remarks were dispicable and his long history of racism and discrimination deserved to finally be addressed. Today it was addressed in a significant and resounding way.

But this court ruling could not have been possible without the voices of every day citizens who refused to sit in silence while hatred dominated.

Racism is real, addressing it directly is the only appropriate action when it threatens to infringe upon hard-fought racial progress in American society.

America still has a long way to travel before we arrive at the destination of full, racial equality and equity in every area of American life, but part of the journey is defending the ground that has already been won.

Thank you for all your support.

Timothy Dwight Smith
Founder/CEO
ContraCritic News

http://m.espn.go.com/nba/story?storyId=11277942

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Timothy Dwight Smith is the Editor-and Chief at ContraCritic News, where he writes about culture, politics, and social issues.

Timothy Dwight Smith is the Editor-and Chief at ContraCritic News, where he writes about culture, politics, and social issues.

The thing about being a single man in your thirties is that you’re hopefully too mentally mature to date women under twenty-five but women over forty, although ideal because of their ability to be straightforward and honest about their wants and needs, may never fully trust that you possess the strength to forego temptations of younger women, and if you don’t have children, the 40-something woman will wonder whether she is setting herself up for future failure. She’s probably had her children and doesn’t seek to be a mother again at this point of her life. Fair enough.

So what’s a man to do?

Explore the pool of women in their thirties is the only other option. And this, in my experience, is the stickiest of options of which to choose.

While women’s behavior in their twenties can easily be chalked up to bad choices and inexperience, a woman in her thirties cannot be afforded the same level of understanding.

The same for women in their forties who refuse to entertain foolishness from younger men who just don’t fit their lifestyle or future plans.

There are so many types of women in their thirties, one could hardly define all the variations, but in my experience, here are a few:

The 30-something woman who still believes she’s twenty-two; lacks education, and has at least 2-3 kids all under 18, usually by different men. The men she has chosen to have children with aren’t a part of the children’s lives at all. This type more often than not doesn’t have a career, maybe a job, and their dream mate is some combination of Lil’ Wayne’s appearance, Bruh Man’s intelligence, and O.J. Simpson’s career outlook.

There’s the 30-something woman that is educated and career centered, but parties HARD every chance she gets. She believes she has to compensate for the “lost years” during her twenties when she was being responsible while her friends were not. This type has usually been married before for a short period and divorced or been in a long-term relationship which spanned 5-7 years. She almost always has at least one child. Dating this type is problematic because despite her formal education and career, she doesn’t possess maturity to go along with it, thus she’s attempting to live out her “second childhood” under the guise of personal liberation.

Then there’s the 30-something female who is thoughtful, funny, and pleasant. She has some education but maybe not a degree. Her most valuable education is the life she’s lived because her mistakes have grounded her in an appreciation of her strengths and weaknesses. She knows who she is and is comfortable being herself. This type generally knows what she wants from a mate and is beyond settling for the thug or the player just because he can make her toes curl. She has a few children, maybe teenagers. She’s either been married before or was in a long-term relationship during her twenties. She has a career.

This type of woman would seem to be a suitable match for the conscientious man in his thirties, considering she lives a balanced life and has endured experiences that have allowed her to know exactly what she wants at this stage. And what does she want?

MARRIAGE.

She wants it bad too. The sooner the better. She doesn’t want to be 40 and single. She’s beginning to wonder what life will be like when her teenage kids move out and start their lives. Marriage is the solution for her. Honestly, this type of woman might indeed make a great wife, but dating her is often filled with pressure, it’s like you’re on the marriage clock from the second she realizes your a good catch. Most people don’t operate well under pressure, including most men.

Which brings me to the last type. The 30-something woman who is by all outside indications the perfect catch. She’s educated, with an advanced degree. She has a career that pays well. She’s managed to avoid having children in her twenties which has allowed her to experience more of the world than the average 30-something female. She’s financially responsible and economically stable. She dates regularly, but has been single since earning her Bachelors degree six years ago. Her ideal mate is Barack Obama, but she’ll settle for Trey Songz or Idris Elba. She’s a bit materialistic and superficial, but it’s not overbearing. She wants to get married but ONLY if the man has the same level of education and economic stability (or more) as she does. She’s intelligent, but not deep. Polite, but not sweet. Conceited because of her accomplishments not her looks.

This type of woman at first glance appears as perfect as the mate she desires for herself, but upon closer examination her ambition masks a personal insecurity that drives most men away. The men who stick around often do so just to exploit her in some way, and their exploitation shapes her negative views of men in general, and increases her desire to find the perfect match. Dating an insecure person is like playing Russian roulette, it’s impossible to predict when and how their insecurity will manifest from day-to-day. Most people who’ve dated someone who was unsure of themselves eventually had to walk away, but not before repeated attempts to prove to the other their loyalty. Which, predictably, became an endless cycle of assurance and reassurance.

As human beings we’re all flawed, men and women. We bring into relationships our past experiences, whether good or bad, and despite our best efforts, these past experiences often determine the success or failure of future romantic relationships. We’ve all made choices we wish we could take back, but that’s not possible, we must live with our decisions while we try to find our own slice of happiness.

I guess I began writing all of this with the intention of having a little fun, but it’s also because at times it can feel as if the game of life is set up for us to fail, especially in the dating game. And while I don’t believe ultimate happiness is to be found in another person, the trials of this life may just be a little easier to bear with a special someone in your corner who has your back. I think this is what most single people want. But as a 30-year old man, this reality remains elusive.

What are your thoughts on the dating game as a person over 30?

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In the wake of the audio recording of Los Angeles Clippers’ owner Donald Sterling’s racist remarks about African-Americans and other racial minorities, it is incumbent upon not only NBA leadership, specifically, NBA commissioner Adam Silver, but also all NBA owners to move in solidarity by taking any and all possible legal actions to force Donald Sterling to relinquish his ownership of the L.A. Clippers.

The NBA is a league made up of mostly African-American players. Some of the NBA’s greatest stars, past and present, have also been African-American, and the league has marketed and promoted the names and images of stars like Michael Jordan, Isaiah Thomas, Kareem Abdul-Jabbar, Chris Paul, Blake Griffin, and Magic Johnson all over the world to increase the popularity of the game of basketball as well as the NBA’s own financial interests.

Donald Sterling’s remarks are reprehensible and repugnant, but most of all intolerable and a slap in the face to all NBA’s players and fans who wish to live in a world that is more tolerant, more respectful, and more loving then what Donald Sterling obviously envisions by his narrow-minded, bigoted, and paranoid views on race.

NBA players and employees should not have to tolerate working for nor contributing to the enrichment of a racist miscreant like Donald Sterling. Immediate action should be taken by the NBA to ensure that those who are a part of the NBA family are treated with dignity and respect; this means ousting Donald Sterling and any others who espouse his hateful views from NBA ownership.

(Donald Sterling’s racist remarks can be heard here:

http://www.tmz.com/2014/04/26/donald-sterling-clippers-owner-black-people-racist-audio-magic-johnson/ )

Please sign Change.org petition to have racist Clippers’ owner Donald Sterling removed.

https://www.change.org/petitions/racist-nba-owner-donald-sterling-l-a-clippers-nba-commissioner-and-nba-owners-compel-racist-donald-sterling-to-step-down-as-clippers-owner#invite